Pontus Marine

Thursday, December 18, 2014

UK Policy paper : Somalia operational plan 2014

(Medeshi)- Following is a document released by Gov.UK outlining  the operational plans for Somalia. It includes Operational plans set out, for spending teams within DFID, what and how they plan to deliver with their allocated resources.

Introduction
In 2013 the UK became the first G7 country to meet the United Nations target of spending 0.7% of gross
national income on international development. The Department for International Development (DFID) uses that investment to help countries to lift themselves out of poverty and leave poverty behind. Operational plans set out to the public how we plan to deliver results across policy areas and for every country we work in. These plans clearly explain why, and how, DFID is targeting its resources and what we expect to achieve; covering the period up until March 2016.
DFID is focused on spending in the right ways, on the right things, in the right places. The portfolio of our
projects is already shifting to deliver a more coherent, focused and ambitious approach to economic
development. We are helping to build strong and investable business environments in developing countries and improving access to finance for entrepreneurs.
Improving the prospects for girls and women in developing countries is a priority. Investing in girls and women is the smart thing to do, as well as the right thing to do. By unleashing their potential, we see returns for girls and women themselves, their families and communities, and for their economies and countries. No country can successfully develop if it leaves half its population behind.
Life-saving humanitarian assistance remains one of DFID’s most fundamental responsibilities. When disaster
strikes or conflict erupts we are first on the ground to support the most vulnerable people. We are also
increasing our efforts to help those countries that are at higher risk of natural disasters to become more resilient in the first place.
DFID continues to drive value for money in everything we do on behalf of the British taxpayer. We have
improved our procurement and programme management, increased our internal audit oversight and we are
ensuring that staff have the skills to deliver the Department’s priorities.
On the international stage we are working hard to agree a new set of global development goals to replace the
Millennium Development Goals when they expire next year. We are determined to secure a clear and inspiring set of goals for the post 2015 development framework that leave no one behind.
Increasingly we will take new and innovative approaches and we will work with new partners. This will include businesses who are increasingly major development players. During Secretary of State’s time as co-chair of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, DFID played a key role in encouraging different development actors to work together and use internationally agreed principles for aid and development effectiveness.
As our operational plans set out, our approach to international development is ambitious and innovative. We are determined to ensure that every pound DFID spends has the biggest possible impact on the ground. Ultimately by investing in developing countries, we can end aid dependency for good and build a better, more prosperous world for us all.

Somalia operational plan 2014